Assignment 5 – REWORKED

Following my tutor’s feedback I reworked Assignment 5.

This is a short video explaining the result, followed by a textual description with images; my reworded artist’s statement; and a brief overall evaluation of my Drawing 1 experience:

Part 5 Assignment - with individual drawing tabs pasted 2
My original Assignment 5 submission – chronological story of my ‘journey’ and overly busy

The original Assignment 5 submission can be found here: Part 5: Assignment 5 – Personal Project

Reworked Assignment 5 submission

IMG_2408_1Spectacular bodies 1
My reworked Assignment 5 submission – pared back and refocused in a more imaginative, less chronological way

Detailed images from the reworked submission

IMG_2417Spectacular bodies 1
‘Creepy-crawly man’ detail – drawing in ink pen on insulation board
IMG_2416Spectacular bodies 1
Couple – Ink pen on insulation board
IMG_2415Spectacular bodies 1
Woman – in water-soluble wax pastel on insulation board
IMG_2432Spectacular bodies 1
Man – Graphite pencil and ink pen on insulation board
IMG_2433Spectacular bodies 1
Woman – Block ink and water brush on insulation board
IMG_2421Spectacular bodies 1
New window into detailed drawing, with drawing on flap
IMG_2422Spectacular bodies 1
iPad drawing framed in canvas
IMG_2423Spectacular bodies 1
iPad landscape drawing framed in canvas
IMG_2425Spectacular bodies 1
iPad drawing framed in canvas, with background face through the door of the ‘shotgun croft house’
IMG_2441Spectacular bodies 1
Original detail of the start of my journey – “wee boy to big boy”
IMG_2442Spectacular bodies 1
Original detail of the start of my journey – the ‘viewpoint’
IMG_2443Spectacular bodies 1
Scratching into overpainted area of original work – beach stump with rope
IMG_2444Spectacular bodies 1
Scratching into overpainted area of original work – chair
IMG_2439Spectacular bodies 1
‘Cutting in’ – skyscape through a peek hole
IMG_2412Spectacular bodies 1
‘Cutting in’ – still life through a peep hole
IMG_2445Spectacular bodies 1
Ditched ink drawing on A3 pvc clear sheet – not quite up to scratch

Re-worded Artist’s Statement

My Drawing 1 Journey reworked – Artist’s Statement

Overall evaluation of Drawing 1 experience

Stuart Brownlee – 512319 Drawing 1 overall evaluation

Stuart Brownlee – 512319
18 May 2016

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Part 5: Tutor report

In the review of my tutor’s feedback for Assignment 4, I said that “all in all, the gauntlet is truly down for Part 5!”

How true this turned out to be. Having had the original idea to explore my journey through Drawing 1 in this final piece for Assignment 5, I soon became consumed by the process itself – of transferring my idea to reality – and ended with a piece of work laying out chronologically my journey through the course from warm-up/Part 1 through to Part 4. As my tutor has observed: “a timeline of sorts, from left to right”.

My tutor’s recommendation is for me to review this final piece. While his view is that “it is well on its way towards being a strong piece”, I should nonetheless consider playing “…to its strengths … the little pockets of detailed information, from previous sketches that float in this colourful background … break up the chronological aspect – allow the viewer to float through different time periods, mixing intense areas of detail, areas of flat colour, areas of deep perspective…”

So, my task now is to reflect on this, be prepared to take big risks with what I thought was a finished piece of work, and rework it aiming for a final Assignment piece that displays more of a “non-chronological/imaginative wandering of a curious mind”.

I have prepared a short video that explains this, partly because I cannot send both the original work and the reworked piece for comparison, as they are one and the same.

The video can be found here: https://stuartbrownleeocadrawing1.wordpress.com/2016/05/04/part-5-assignment-5-review/

Stuart Brownlee – 512319
4 May 2016

Part 5: Assignment 5 – Personal Project

Brief

Carry out a written self-assessment of each of the previous assignments, noting successes and problems that need to be resolved. Hopefully you’ve already done this during the course; if so, revisit your earlier notes and add any new thoughts. Next, select one of the previous four assignments as the starting point for your personal project.

The options are:

• Line, space and form
• Your immediate environment
• Outdoors
• The figure and face

In Part Five you have greater freedom to pursue some of the things that interested you most throughout the course. Choose a project to develop from one of the earlier parts of the course in consultation with your tutor. It may be possible to combine options – for example, combining elements from Part Three Outdoors with animal studies from Part Two – but discuss it with your tutor first.

Be guided by your own interests, tastes and inclination in finding a subject and feel free to develop your own interpretation. Experiment, be bold and let your intuitive and emotional involvement influence your approach to this final assignment. Imagine your portfolio in a room full of other portfolios and make sure yours stands out for its visual impact.

Whatever your choice of subject, you should aim initially to be objective and highly critical in your approach. As you progress with the project, you may find that certain aspects of your subject come to life for you or that you become fascinated by a certain quality that you could develop into more abstract handling.

You’ll know by now the value and necessity of your sketchbook. As your technical skill develops so will your critical capacity. Throughout your initial experiments, keep on reviewing both the studies you’ve made in your sketchbook and your larger drawings. Reviewing your work should be an ongoing process, both while drawing and in assessing your final pieces.

Written assessment of previous assignments

In reflecting back and self-assessing the previous four assignments for Drawing 1 “Drawing Skills”, I have chosen to take the course as a whole to summarise my thoughts, rather than each individual assignment in turn.

From my own thinking and my tutor’s comments throughout the course I am reasonably confident in assessing some of the more successful elements of my progression to date. In no particular order:

I can see strengths in my reflections on the process of drawing, both in my written online learning log entries and also in my research workbook for the course which is an A3 ring bound sketchbook. I find that this size allows me scope to lay out my research intuitively:

Part 3 Project 2 Research point 3 - page 8
Part 3 Project 2 Research point 3 – page 8

I am comfortable in trying out new grounds; different sizes and quality of paper, canvas boards and sheets, and different types and sizes of sketchbooks (concertina, A5 and A4 ring bound, lay flat, and ‘Enviro’ recycled paper and boards):

Part 3 Project 5 Exercise 2 - Townscape study using line - sketches
Part 3 Project 5 Exercise 2 – Townscape study using line – sketches

I am more comfortable with working in a loose manner, playing around with a variety of drawing media and mark making, experimenting and taking risks:

Part 2 Project 6 Exercise 5 - Mixed media - 'Whatever happened to Cecil?'
Part 2 Project 6 Exercise 5 – Mixed media – ‘Whatever happened to Cecil?’

I believe I have a reasonable understanding of perspective and chiaroscuro in the application of line and tone in my drawings:

Part 3 Project 3 Exercise 1 - Developing your studies - finished drawing with overlays
Part 3 Project 3 Exercise 1 – Developing your studies – finished drawing with overlays

My compositional abilities are improving, trying to think about placement of objects in keeping with ‘rule of thirds’ or ‘golden ratio’ criteria. However, some of my arrangements could be stronger / less closed-in:

Assignment 1 - final drawing
Assignment 1 – final drawing

Having said that, there is evidence of exploration of the real and unreal in my work as well as looking at multiple viewpoints:

Part 2 Assignment - Finished drawing
Part 2 Assignment – Finished drawing

With regards to some of the challenges I still see before me, again in no particular order, I am aware of the following:

More preparatory sketches/thumbnails are needed before I embark on final work – I still find myself often moving straight to the canvas/paper with the intention of producing a finished/polished piece of work, rather than using the looseness of my sketchbooks to plan and map out what I plan to do in advance, experimenting with different approaches to the initial idea and exploring ways of looking at the idea/subject and how best to tell the story/create a narrative in the drawing:

Part 4 Project 2 Exercise 1 - Quick studies, sketches 6-8
Part 4 Project 2 Exercise 1 – Quick studies, sketches 6-8
Part 4 Project 2 Exercise 1 - Quick studies, 10 min sketch 2
Part 4 Project 2 Exercise 1 – Quick studies, 10 min sketch 2

I need to be more adventurous in applying layers to my drawings, pushing the ‘thickening’ of the drawing, varying tempo and trying to get at the ‘essence’ of what the drawing is trying to say. I am still a bit unsure about what ‘having a conversation with my work’ actually means:

Part 3 Project 4 Exercise 3 - Aerial or atmospheric perspective - tonal study 3
Part 3 Project 4 Exercise 3 – Aerial or atmospheric perspective – tonal study 3

My major challenges, I feel, come in depicting the human figure accurately, with correct proportions. This is where, I am sure, my ‘looseness’ of approach to my drawing lets me down in the technical application of measuring proportions (sight-size/pencil-thumb at arms length method), editing and erasure of lines, tones and angles of the human body in order to achieve correct depictions of the human form:

Part 4 Project 5 Exercise 1 - Single moving figure, sketch 12
Part 4 Project 5 Exercise 1 – Single moving figure, sketch 12

Another factor is also likely to be the absence of access to life drawing classes due to my geographical location in a Highland glen. My main models have been myself, my wife and a selection of 360⸋ models from DVDs:

Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 - Energy, idea sketches 7-8
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 – Energy, idea sketches 7-8 [from 360⸋ DVD models]
Arguably, for me at this stage in my drawing journey, my major challenge is trying to establish or realise my ‘personal voice’.

Finding a subject

Before you choose a subject or theme for this project, carefully review the work you did for the relevant part of the course. Consider what were for you the most enjoyable and successful studies. Evaluate your drawings in terms of technical skill, creativity, what you need to alter, adapt, build on further, etc.

Before you start work, think about:

• Subject – or focus of your drawing
• Format – landscape, portrait, other?
• Support – paper, board, found material?
• Medium – single, combined, mixed, experimental approach?
• Line, tone – a combination of both?
• Composition – traditional or experimental?
• Mood, story, visual impression
• Abstract or realist – a combination of both?
• Light – natural or artificial?
• Size – negotiate with your tutor

Picture46
OCA student, James Lloyd, Dartmoor Crosses
Picture47
OCA student, Joe Clarke, Outdoor Drawing

Do you want to work with bold, large gestures, or does your subject suggest more delicate and subtle handling? Are you going to explore line and tonal values with a limited palette?

By now you’ll have experimented with a full range of drawing media and you’ve probably got an idea of what you want to use. If you do decide to use a less familiar medium in any part of your work, experiment first on loose sheets and in your sketchbook.

Make sure that you’ll have plenty of time with the right amount of light. If you’re working outside, will you need to visit your site more than once? Consider your light source carefully. If you wish to work on figure studies in natural light you may have to book time with your model at the same time of day over two sessions. If you’re to work by artificial light you’ll need to ensure that this is well placed both for you to see to work and for your model to be lit in the most effective way. The same applies if the model is you.

Have you got the right equipment for the job? If you’re working on landscape, for example, working on a larger surface will mean that you may need a board that you can tilt towards you. (Any drawing surface must always be on the right plane in relation to your eyes to avoid distortion.)

If you’re working with the human form, will you do a figure study, a head and shoulders portrait, a self-portrait of just your face or a whole figure self-portrait? Will you explore expressive aspects of figure or portrait drawing or work more objectively on an analytical study? Will you include the background? If so, will that form an essential part of your enquiry? Will the background or any objects included as ‘props’ have any significance?

Think how you might use colour to convey mood and atmosphere. For example, you could use colour washes to express tonal values alongside hard drawing media but you’ll have to apply these at the start or end of your study if your paper is upright or tilted otherwise you’ll get streaming lines running down the paper – this may or may not be an effect that you want. Experiment first with a range of techniques before starting your larger piece.

These are just some of the questions you’ll need to consider. Make sure that you note down the rationale for any decisions you make in your learning log. You’ll probably want to include some of this information in your artist’s statement (see below).

Whatever your subject, keep looking at it and finding fresh ways to interpret it. Each time you look at it you’ll see something different. Adopt an open and enquiring approach and search for an interpretation of your subject that is right for you. Keep looking at other artists for inspiration as you go.

Choosing my personal project

I believe my weakest element of the course is drawing the human figure, so I decided I wanted to address this aspect in my personal project in some way.

However, my strongest desire was to take the course as a whole and do something that expresses my experience of the journey from Part 1 through to Part 4.

In thinking more about my approach I took some more time out, before finally deciding, to experiment with a number of sketching opportunities trying to cover the themes of the course:

• Line, space and form
• Your immediate environment
• Outdoors
• The figure and face

My first 6 sketches were done on an iPadPro and then worked on (see Sketches 1 – 6 below)

iPad sketches:

This is a new experience. I have dabbled before, but this is the first time I have attempted a wee series of sketches on the iPad. These six were done using the ‘Artrage’ app. I also introduced some colour in sketches 3 and 6:

iPad sketch 1
iPad sketch 1
iPad sketch 2
iPad sketch 2
iPad sketch 3
iPad sketch 3
iPad sketch 4
iPad sketch 4
iPad sketch 5
iPad sketch 5
iPad sketch 6
iPad sketch 6

Sketches:

The first sketches in this section are reworkings of the iPad sketches. I wanted to experiment with taking the digital sketches, printing them and then adding layer(s) to them:

Part 5 Assignment sketch 1
Part 5 Assignment sketch 1

“Crossword”, iPad drawing printed onto cut A4 canvas sheet & dry brush wash over charcoal.

Part 5 Assignment sketch 2
Part 5 Assignment sketch 2

“Lotty”, iPad drawing printed onto cut A4 canvas sheet & Artbar water-soluble wax bar.

Part 5 Assignment sketch 3
Part 5 Assignment sketch 3

“Keiss, Caithness”, iPad drawing printed onto cut A4 canvas sheet with no additions.

Part 5 Assignment sketch 4
Part 5 Assignment sketch 4

“Over the dyke. Keiss, Caithness”, iPad drawing printed onto cut A4 canvas sheet & Artbar water soluble wax bar and wash.

Part 5 Assignment sketch 5
Part 5 Assignment sketch 5

“Over the dyke 2, Keiss, Caithness”, iPad drawing printed onto cut A4 canvas sheet & Inktense block and wash.

Part 5 Assignment sketch 6
Part 5 Assignment sketch 6

“Shotgun croft, Dunbeath, Caithness”, iPad drawing printed onto cut A4 canvas sheet & Polychromos colour pencil and wash.

The remaining sketches were made without technology:

Part 5 Assignment sketch 7
Part 5 Assignment sketch 7

“Garden pheasant”, outdoor drawing on A4 cut canvas gessoed sheet & brush and ink.

Part 5 Assignment sketch 8
Part 5 Assignment sketch 8

“Woodpecker”, outdoor garden drawing on A4 cut canvas gessoed sheet & brush and ink.

Part 5 Assignment sketch 9
Part 5 Assignment sketch 9

Wild goats”, outdoor hill drawing on A4 pastel paper & pastel.

Part 5 Assignment sketch 10
Part 5 Assignment sketch 10

“Water lilies”, our garden pond drawing on A5 paper & multi-media.

Part 5 Assignment sketch 11
Part 5 Assignment sketch 11

“Dancers”, on A5 paper with black gesso & tinted charcoal pencil.

Part 5 Assignment sketch 12
Part 5 Assignment sketch 12

“Contemporary dancers 1”, on A4 cut white gessoed canvas sheet & colour pencil.

Part 5 Assignment sketch 13
Part 5 Assignment sketch 13

“Contemporary dancers 2”, on A4 cut white gessoed canvas sheet & ink wash.

Part 5 Assignment sketch 14
Part 5 Assignment sketch 14

“Contemporary dancers 3”, on A4 cut white gessoed canvas sheet & conté crayon.

Part 5 Assignment sketch 15
Part 5 Assignment sketch 15

“Self portrait”, on A4 cut canvas gessoed sheet & conté crayon.

Part 5 Assignment sketch 16
Part 5 Assignment sketch 16

“Calm, Anger, Joy & Fear” (from Part1, Project 1, Exercise 1 – expressive lines and marks). Didn’t quite manage to capture the joy!

Part 5 Assignment sketches 17
Part 5 Assignment sketches 17

“Calm, Anger, Joy & Fear” (from Part1, Project 1, Exercise 1 – expressive lines and marks) and developed in self portrait sketches: Calm in charcoal stick; Anger in oil pastel; Joy? in ink; and Fear in graphite pencil. Still struggling with much ‘Joy’ – seems more like ‘surprise’, but in a good way!

In producing these 17 pieces I experimented with different grounds, drawing media and techniques to try and capture the idea and create some form of narrative in each drawing (one of my identified challenges).

This thinking time-out allowed me to firm up on my chosen personal project for Assignment 5 – “My Drawing 1 Journey”.

My artist’s statement

Your second task for Assignment Five is to produce a short written statement (around 500 words) where you discuss your chosen option: why you chose it, which artists, materials, methods, themes, etc., interest you and why. Consider this as a proposal or plan, clearly setting out the task that you’ll attempt and how you’ll do this. Using your own words, think about what you’d like to test through drawing, and this will then become the title of your project, for example:

Title: ‘Combining movement and trees, looking at [artists, materials, styles, etc.]’
Title: ‘Investigating animals used in fairy stories, looking at …..’ 
Title: ‘Using tone only in a series of self-portraits, using [your chosen media]’
(etc., etc.)

These are simple examples but you’ll fit your artist’s statement to the project you
want to carry out for Assignment Five. As you work through this final drawing project, reflect on what you’ve done before and what you’re doing now, and make notes in your learning log. You can use these notes alongside photos of your work in progress and your experimental test pieces as supporting material for your final statement, so make sure you keep everything together in your learning log. When writing try to critically assess your own work and complete a piece of writing that will inform the reader about your progress towards this personal project.

Note: This written element of the course is not about writing style or your ability to use words well. It’s about showing your ability to think clearly and creatively about your own drawing, and being able to inform and build your practice through looking at what others do, why they do it and how you might learn from their example. Your artist’s statement should accurately reflect your journey through your chosen personal project.

See the assignment as a whole as an opportunity to test an interesting idea through a combination of drawing and writing. In basic academic terms this is practice-led research, and once you progress to a higher level of study this will become more important.

“My Drawing 1 Journey” – artist’s statement

Q. What do I want to test through my drawing journey?

A. To tell my story visually in a creative way that describes what I have done and what I have learnt and experienced from my journey.

Q. What will I produce, on what material, in what media?

A. Big and bold is my idea – A pictorial journey laid out on an A1 canvas board in mixed media.

Q. What will it say and why?

A. Snapshots of my Drawing 1 experience through cut-outs of a selection of my course sketches and drawings in a narrative that takes me from my childhood (pre-OCA) to now, and looking forward to my continuing drawing aspirations.

Q. The practicalities done with, what makes this an exciting proposition?

A. Firstly, in reviewing the previous parts of the course I have identified where I have been more successful (looseness and experimentation with material, media and approach):

Kettle
[Part 1, Project 2, Exercise 4 – shadows & reflected light.]
And more importantly, where I have specific challenges in my drawing journey (technical aspects, particularly in drawing the human figure – proportion, lines, angles and tones):

Figures
[Part 4, Project 4, Exercise 1 – the structure of the human body.]
Secondly, I have been encouraged by my tutor to give more thought to a number of creative and technical aspects of my drawing. The list is not exhaustive, but includes:

Sight/Size with pencil/thumb at arms length to measure proportion/angle/tone more accurately; mixed media experiments; layers of drawing material; and narrative/story, to mention a few.

In “My Drawing 1 Journey” I hope to explore at least some of these pointers.

Thirdly, throughout the course I have been influenced by a number of writers, artists, materials, methods, and themes:

In Deanna Petherbridge’s 2010 work The primacy of drawing: histories and theories of practice there is a proposal that the act of drawing can be seen as a continuum. My interpretation of this dynamic is that:

Line is the primal act in art-making
● It connects/continues with chiaroscuro to form both linear and spatial complexity
● This, in itself, creates connections with all the paths of the continuum
● These in turn converge and diverge at either end of the continuum.

(Petheridge, 2010, Chp.1).

Specific artist influences that I am carrying into my personal project include the cubist abstraction of Georges Braque’s still life “Bottle and fishes”, (c1910-12), which I find a playful fragmentation into a series of planes providing multiple viewpoints into the picture. Anthony Green’s “Christmas” mirror, 1947” (1982) also deals with different perspectives. The “Off the Map” series of collage work by the Hungarian artist Zsofia Schweger is also pertinent as her concept of “an image of a room [that] could contain the whole world” excites me, as does the diaristic aspect of Tracy Emin’s monoprint drawings and her conceptual art installation work as self portraits – “this is me, who I am, who I might be”.

My continuum here, “My Drawing 1 Journey”, is basically a mind-dump in order to help create a blank page for moving forward with my drawing and artistic practice. [520 words]

Stuart Brownlee – 512319
25 March 2016

“My Drawing 1 Journey” – finished work

Part 5 Assignment - initial idea

Part 5 Assignment – initial idea

Initial idea for reflecting on my journey through this course sketched, badly, out on my iPad – a drawing map of images, looking back and looking forward, using a selection of images from previous exercises. My idea was originally have the main figure as a self portrait raised up on a curved area on the ground. After sketching this out I decided to reverse the concept, with the figure looking forward on the right hand side, rather than looking back over the course.

Part 5 Assignment - beginning
Part 5 Assignment – beginning

I began by creating a base for my evolving idea using a canvas panel – 61x82cm – triple gesso, A4 card, plastic glue, brown paper and tissue paper to stuff into the “ripples” to help hold them firm(er).

Part 5 Assignment - addition of masking tape to taper out the cones formed by the card
Part 5 Assignment – addition of masking tape to taper out the cones formed by the card
Part 5 Assignment - Sellotape, white gesso, light fabric, PVA glue to “fix’ the ground
Part 5 Assignment – Sellotape, white gesso, light fabric, PVA glue to “fix’ the ground
Part 5 Assignment - ground with white gesso covering, ready for work
Part 5 Assignment – ground with white gesso covering, ready for work
Part 5 Assignment - ground ideas
Part 5 Assignment – ground ideas

On a print-out of a photograph of the gessoed ground I marked out the areas of my journey; from warm up and Part 1 exercises, through ‘Own environment’, ‘Outdoors’ Figure & the face’, and finishing by looking forward to my personal development (Part 5).

Part 5 Assignment - mound contours from the bottom on flat surface
Part 5 Assignment – mound contours from the bottom on flat surface
Part 5 Assignment - coloured acrylic ground
Part 5 Assignment – coloured acrylic ground

These coloured cones/ripples represent the ups/downs of my Drawing 1 experience. I like to think of them as my ‘Stornoway black pudding hills’. My journey really began in the late 1950’s early 1960’s when my parents used to take the family to the Island of Aran off the west coast of Scotland for annual holidays at the ‘Glasgow Fair’ (two weeks in July). From a tenement in the south side of Glasgow to the sandy beaches of Lamlash on Aran I was released into a new world of exploring, playing and enjoying myself in the safety of an island community, often without adult supervision – freedom! I therefore decided to start my OCA Drawing 1 story back then, sitting with a stick making marks.

Part 5 Assignment - detail, bottom left corner
Part 5 Assignment – detail, bottom left corner

My journey from a youngster interested in mark making took me through Higher Art at school, a residential art course at Castle Toward outside Dunoon in Argyle, thoughts of Art School – and then life: a wife, a house and a new job as a librarian (cataloguing and indexing might be seen as ‘creative’, but not particularly ‘artistic’). Only when I retired from working life in 2012 did I consider picking up on my long-dormant interest in things artistic. I became a Trustee of a local contemporary dance company and embarked on an OCA Painting 1 course. So, this is my second course, and now that I am a big boy I’m again enjoying exploring mark making.

Part 5 Assignment - first layout of journey cut-outs
Part 5 Assignment – first layout of journey cut-outs

I selected a range of images from the course, printed them out, cut and laid out on the ground: warm-up, Part 1 on the left through to Part 4 on the right, and looking forward. I also laid out some ‘word clouds’ of drawing terms and language that I felt appropriate for my chosen personal development project.

Part 5 Assignment - journey cut-outs pasted onto ground
Part 5 Assignment – journey cut-outs pasted onto ground
Part 5 Assignment - vertical water colour washes merged between mounds and eye level line drawn
Part 5 Assignment – vertical water colour washes merged between mounds and eye level line drawn

I wanted to try and blend the starkness of the printed cut-out images with the vertical coloured bands. I used colour washes to achieve this, although I.m not sure it really worked. The eye level line is drawn for my eye level standing in front of the A1 board on the easel.

Part 5 Assignment - Other perspective lines drawn
Part 5 Assignment – Other perspective lines drawn

Adding more lines to reach from the top left “viewing platform” to the vanishing point on the right; from the bottom left “starting point” in my journey to the VP on the right and the future; and lines from pencil thumb points to VP.

Crazily tricky with the ups and downs of the mounds – needs two more lines on right.

Part 5 Assignment - final bottom layer
Part 5 Assignment – final bottom layer
Part 5 Assignment - 2 added perspective lines on right + 3 x additional clear polyester left & right drawing surfaces affixed
Part 5 Assignment – 2 added perspective lines on right + 3 x additional clear polyester left & right drawing surfaces affixed

I was keen to address layering in my drawing in a slightly different way by adding clear polyester A4 panels onto which I could draw.

Part 5 Assignment - left hand beginning of story
Part 5 Assignment – left hand beginning of story

Additional polyester drawing surface – fixed with ring-binder mechanism and good old rivets.

Part 5 Assignment - right hand end of story : what’s next
Part 5 Assignment – right hand end of story : what’s next

Additional polyester drawing surfaces x 2 (bottom one closed over looking back/reflecting, top one open pointing to the future).

The ring binder fixings allows the viewer to interact with the drawing by “opening” and “closing” the three polyester drawing surfaces.

Part 5 Assignment - clear polyester drawings in fineliner pen and indian ink wash
Part 5 Assignment – clear polyester drawings in fineliner pen and indian ink wash

These were drawn separately and fixed, once dry, with matt varnish spray.

Part 5 Assignment - new figure:portrait drawings on ground - looking forward and looking back - reflective and what now
Part 5 Assignment – new figure portrait drawings on ground – looking forward and looking back – reflective and “what now…”
Part 5 Assignment - new drawings extended
Part 5 Assignment – new drawings extended
Part 5 Assignment - seeing through
Part 5 Assignment – seeing through

I scraped a rough area of the forehead so that the viewer could have a peek at what lay beneath the surface. Spookily, it’s part of a sketch of my wife as model.

Part 5 Assignment - with individual drawing tabs pasted 1
Part 5 Assignment – Finished drawing, with individual drawing tabs pasted 1

Finished by adding name tabs to the individual cut-out sketches, much as you might find in a gallery, from Part 1 through to Part 4.

Part 5 Assignment - with individual drawing tabs pasted 2
Part 5 Assignment – Finished drawing, with individual drawing tabs pasted 2

I realised early on that this work was going to need some serious packaging for transport to protect it’s potential fragility. This gave me the idea to make use of the securing packing material for additional drawing:

Packaging material drawings – making use of additional surface – recto

Part 5 Assignment - “Packaging drawings”
Part 5 Assignment – “Packaging drawings”

On Joblite 25mm universal insulation board with white gesso & Gorilla tape. Having explored my Drawing 1 journey graphically, I wanted to address some figure drawing challenges on an unusual surface – the packaging material used to protect “My journey”. Selecting my chosen poses from the DVD accompanying Krieger, B. and Books, L.M. (2015) Figure drawing studio: Drawing and painting the nude figure from pose photos. New York: Sterling Pub. Co., I used various drawing media to envisage my ideas on a marker pen coloured background.

Of particular interest to me is the effect that the almost pixellated surface of the insulation board has, showing through the drawings, even in some that have an ‘old masters’ effect of what could be oil paint and varnish.

Part 5 Assignment - Packaging drawings, indicating drawing medium used.
Part 5 Assignment – Packaging drawings, indicating drawing medium used.

And why not make use of the other side as well …

Packaging material drawings – making use of additional surface – verso

Part 5 Assignment - Packing drawing 1
Part 5 Assignment – Packing drawing 1

On the reverse of the figure drawings I chose to try a self portrait on graphite powder with a charcoal stick line sketch.

Part 5 Assignment - Packing drawing 2
Part 5 Assignment – Packing drawing 2

First layer with marker pen. On top of the preparatory line sketch I layered in masking pen inks to begin to bring the figure forward against the background.

Part 5 Assignment - Packing drawing 3
Part 5 Assignment – Packing drawing 3

Finished drawing with oil pastel and marker pen (masking tape removed). The final layer was applied with Senellier soft oil pastels to try and capture highlights and darker tones better.

Stuart Brownlee – 512319
30 March 2016

Part 4: Tutor report

Part 4 Tutor Report summary

Here’s the big news – my tutor agrees with me that I find depicting the human figure accurately, with correct proportions, somewhat difficult. And so, I need to work on measuring proportions, angles and tones, and in particular make much more use of the ‘sight/size’ method of pencil and thumb held at arms length for measuring what I see for transfer onto paper and also for editing what I have already drawn.

While one of my key strengths might be seen as working in a loose manner and playing around with a variety of materials and marks, going some way to meet the ‘Demonstration of creativity’ course criteria, I do need to improve my drawing from life and portrayal of space in a more accurate manner in order to meet the ‘Demonstration of technical and visual skills’ criteria.

Erasure and correction seems to be the direction here rather than my habit of continually adding to a drawing. This, I feel, will be a habit hard to break at this late stage in Drawing 1, but I’ll give it a go.

In order to try and correct this errant drawing behavior on my part I guess I will need to redo at least some of the Part 4 drawings with all this in mind prior to embarking on my final assignment in Part 5.

The last comment for me to take into Part 5 is that while my reflective writing is good, it’s not quite good enough in terms of the ‘Context’ assessment criteria. What are my drawings saying to a viewer? My tutor suggests that I do this by describing my drawings in about 50 words. Turn those 50 words into 5-6 clear sentences that describe what I am doing. Then interpret my work by comparing and contrasting it to other artists (both historical and contemporary) exploring similar subjects and themes (landscape, memory, atmosphere, etc). What has been written about these other artist’s works and see what connections, if any, I find in my own work. And, finally, explain what I have learnt as a result.

This framework for writing will apparently help me to edit out what is not important to my work anymore and concentrate on what is, together with providing an historical, contemporary and theoretical context for my work.

My tutor has again provided me with further reading, resources and artists to explore going into Part 5.

All in all, the gauntlet is truly down for Part 5!

Stuart Brownlee – 512319
25 January 2016

Part 4: Assignment 4 – Two large figure studies and self-portrait

Brief

For this assignment, you should complete two large figure studies (A1 size) and a portrait or self-portrait (any size) – three drawings in total, together with supporting studies, experiments, etc.

For each drawing, consult your preliminary studies and make notes on what you plan to do. Think about composition, medium and approach. Write a few notes on the artist(s) that have inspired you to work in a particular way. Be inventive in your approach and in the materials you use. You’re not restricted to working with black on white. Try reversing this to white on black, or consider monochrome, perhaps dark blue on pale blue paper, or ink and charcoal on newspaper – the list is endless, so be inventive. Allow around two hours for each drawing.

1 Figure study using line (A1) – Seated model in an upright chair
This study is about drawing three-dimensional form using line. Take particular note of the proportions of the figure and the chair in relation to the whole scene, gradually describing details such as the hands and facial features as well as the folds of clothing using a single line or combinations of lines: narrow and thick, curved and straight, fractured, expressive, gestural, dynamic, dramatic (and so on).

Look back at your notes and studies from previous assignments to rediscover ways to work with line. Try different media and supports; do a few tests with textured and found paper, unusual formats, etc.

Do a few exploratory sketches before starting work on the larger sheet. Try to be as expressive and experimental with the large drawing as you were with the preparatory studies. Try not to tighten up or lose the fluidity and spontaneity that should have evolved since the beginning of the course.

2 Figure study using tone (A1) – Reclining model
Plan the setting carefully. Your model should be dressed in reasonably fitted clothes; it’s a good idea if the clothes contrast in tone (e.g. dark trousers, light top).

Use strong light from one major light source. If you’re using artificial light rather than natural light from a window, experiment by moving the light around to allow the shadows to fall across the figure and the room in an interesting way. Use tone only to create a real sense of form and atmosphere. Remember to use positive and negative spaces, including the small spaces in the hair, between the fingers, and so on.

3 A portrait or self-portrait combining line and tone (any size)
Create a portrait a self-portrait where the features are believable and in proportion to the rest of the face, head, shoulders and chest. Try to find an interesting position rather than looking straight ahead. Use mirrors to view from different angles. In your sketchbook, experiment with some of the ideas you’ve uncovered during your research into other contemporary artists’ work.

Work with variations of tone and expressive line to create an interesting and atmospheric image. For your main light source, you might try using a candle, small lamp or torch in a semi-darkened room to exaggerate the contrasting lights and darks, for example. You might also work very close up with the features filling the sheet. Be xperimental and ambitious in this drawing.

Figure study 1

Assignment 4 - Figure study 1 - material samples
Assignment 4 – Figure study 1 – material samples

Found wood-chip paper from a roll bought in a charity shop – from l-r: black gesso; original roll; white gesso.

Part 4 Assignment 4 - Figure study 1 - prelim sketches
Part 4 Assignment 4 – Figure study 1 – prelim sketches
Assignment 4 - Figure study 1 - chosen ground
Assignment 4 – Figure study 1 – chosen ground

I chose to push my boundaries somewhat and selected a black gesso wash on the wood-chip, mainly to bind a few loose strands of the larger A1 section I had cut from the roll back onto the paper, but also as a challenge to my line drawing.

Assignment 4 - Figure study 1 - first sketch, white charcoal
Assignment 4 – Figure study 1 – first sketch, white charcoal – before clothes

I used a 360º DVD life model from Krieger, B. (2015) Figure drawing studio: drawing and painting the nude figure from pose photos. New York: Sterling Publishing. Drawing the nude female figure from my Mac computer screen with white charcoal pencil to map in the key features and outline of the overall form.

Assignment 4 - Figure study 1 - first sketch, finished
Assignment 4 – Figure study 1 – first figure study, finished

Life model disrobed on blue chair. Once everything was marked in with white charcoal, including robe and flip-flops, I toyed with using soft or oil pastel to render the lines and forms. However, in the end I chose DJECO gel pens and found that the effect achieved on top of the black gesso on wood-chip paper was quite dynamic – with wood-chip and gesso showing through in places adding an unusual texture to the composition. I finished off using a hard crayon pencil to pick out key lines and features.

If I was inspired by any artist in my thinking about this exercise it is probably the Austrian early 20th century figurative painter Egon Schiele. My figure study is arguably not as extremely executed as Schiele’s work, but I am inspired by his exciting mark making.

Figure study 2

Part 4 Assignment 4 - Figure study 2 - prelim sketches
Part 4 Assignment 4 – Figure study 2 – prelim sketches
Assignment 4 - Figure study 2 - second sketch, finished
Assignment 4 – Figure study 2 – second figure study, finished

This pose is also from Krieger, B. (2015) Figure drawing studio: drawing and painting the nude figure from pose photos. New York: Sterling Publishing. However, I have placed it in the context of a simple room on a bed with covers thrown off, cascading onto the floor. The model is lying with her back arched over a pillow. The light is coming through the background window.

Having lightly sketched in the figure I then worked all over with graphite and charcoal pencils to lay down the darker shaded spots. Using graphite powder in an old sock the entire drawing was dapped with varying degrees of graphite covering which I then blended, trying to keep a light touch. Finally, I used a putty rubber to pick out the lighter highlights. If anything, the shadow areas could have even been a bit darker for bolder contrast, but I didn’t want to overdo it.

The paper used was a Waterford 55x75cm 190gsm sheet.

For this exercise, I have been taken with the mastery of a number of nude paintings, such as:

• the Italian 16th century artist Titian “The Venus of Urbino”
• the Spanish 18th century artist Goya “The Nude Maja”
• the French 19th century artist Ingres “La Grande Odalisque”
• the French 19th century artist Courbet “Nude Woman Reclining”
• the French 19th century artist Manet “Olympia”
• the German 20th century artist Wunderlich “Odaliske nach Ingres”.

although I haven’t really managed to realise the inspiration received in my work, yet. I think I still need to be bolder in my execution of dark and light contrasts.

Self portrait

Part 4 Assignment 4 - Figure study 3 - prelim sketch 1
Part 4 Assignment 4 – Figure study 3, self portrait – prelim sketch 1

My inspiration for the final figure study is Courbet’s “The desperate man” for its in-you-face physical reality and the drama of the light and dark contrasts.

Part 4 Assignment 4 - Figure study 3 - prelim sketch 2
Part 4 Assignment 4 – Figure study 3, self portrait – prelim sketch 2

My preliminary sketch for the final figure study – “The thinking man” pondering ‘what’s next’.

Assignment 4 - Figure study 3 - self-portrait, sketch 1
Assignment 4 – Figure study 3 – self-portrait, sketch 1, showing candle light source (bottom right)

I photographed my portrait in a mirror and used the digital image on the computer screen as a reference guide for my initial sketch in 7H pencil.

Assignment 4 - Figure study 3 - self-portrait, sketch 2
Assignment 4 – Figure study 3 – self-portrait, sketch 2

The sketch picked out to show a darker outline using Lightroom.

The final drawing was made on a 50x60cm canvas board using Conté crayon. This took an afternoon to complete, working on the portrait all over to try and keep a coherency to the whole image. Layers of colour were built up and the blending was achieved using both paper stubs and fingers. Once finished, the drawing was given three coats of fixative.

I am pleased with the way this has turned out, while I could have further darkened the darks perhaps I feel that I stopped at the stage because I felt that the contrasts were at the same time subtle and obvious enough to give life to the face and hands, lit as they were from the candle beside me on the drawing table.

I can also see that the previous exercises in sketching facial features and parts of the body have helped me develop my visual skills in relation to the human form. In this self-portrait I believe that I have improved my rendition of eyes, nose and lips, as well as hands and fingers, quite significantly.

Assignment 4 - Figure study 3 - self-portrait, finished drawing
Assignment 4 – Figure study 3 – self-portrait, finished drawing

Critique

This assignment has been an interesting challenge and I am fairly happy with my progress in sketching facial features and parts of the human form. I believe I have used my imagination in composing all three drawings, have been creative in my use of materials as well as showing invention and ambition in the poses depicted. I also feel that I have loosened up my touch and approach to the use of drawing materials, achieving a lighter, gentler touch in working towards three pieces that have varying degrees of impact.

I may not have yet reached a point where I can claim to have developed a ‘personal voice’, but I can see progress in my journey through Drawing 1. However, I can also see some areas where even more improvement can be made – risk-taking; bolder, more assured mark making; and developing a stronger use of tonal contrast.

Stuart Brownlee – 512319
15 January 2016