Part 4: Project 3: Exercise 4 – Energy

Brief

Ask your model to adopt a ‘dynamic’ position – lifting an arm, twisting the hips, turning the head, stretching the arms or walking. They’ll need to be able to hold the pose for about five minutes.

Work on sheets of A3 paper and, using charcoal, brush pens or other tools that allow for broad and sweeping marks, quickly sketch the figure. Try to convey the sense of energy in each pose. Don’t worry about details – concentrate on the sense of movement in the figure.

Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 - course notes image
Marcel Vertes, The Tango (pen and ink)

The drawing above is all about movement. You can see how some rapidly drawn, flowing, undulating lines can create the effect of the dance. Lines repeated and close give the impression of movement. (Think of waves – tidal waves, heat waves, sound waves – all different kinds of repeated small or large movements.) Experiment with creating abstract marks that depict movement in your sketchbook.

Sketchbook ideas

I used charcoal pencil for all of these idea sketches and the models were once again taken from Krieger, B. (2015) Figure drawing studio: drawing and painting the nude figure from pose photos. New York: Sterling Publishing.

Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 - Energy, idea sketches 1-2
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 – Energy, idea sketches 1-2
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 - Energy, idea sketches 3-4
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 – Energy, idea sketches 3-4
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 - Energy, idea sketches 5-6
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 – Energy, idea sketches 5-6
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 - Energy, idea sketches 7-8
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 – Energy, idea sketches 7-8
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 - Energy, idea sketch 9
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 – Energy, idea sketch 9
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 - Energy, idea sketch 10
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 – Energy, idea sketch 10

A3 Drawings

I initially selected 4 idea sketches for my A3 drawings – 1, 4, 7 and 10 and I drew these on 250gsm A3 Bristol Board using black ink and a size 10 Round brush.

Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 - Energy, A3 ink & brush 1
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 – Energy, A3 ink & brush 1
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 - Energy, A3 ink & brush 2
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 – Energy, A3 ink & brush 2
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 - Energy, A3 ink & brush 3
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 – Energy, A3 ink & brush 3
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 - Energy, A3 ink & brush 4
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 – Energy, A3 ink & brush 4

I then selected idea sketches 5 and 8 and drew these on the same paper, but this time using a black marker pen.

Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 - Energy, A3 marker pen 1
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 – Energy, A3 marker pen 1
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 - Energy, A3 marker pen 2
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 – Energy, A3 marker pen 2

Critique

I found that using my sketchbook to draft out some of the ideas about the figures I had selected helped a lot, both by practice with the charcoal pencil and also to allow my eye to get in the way of seeing flowing lines to hint at the sense of movement. One thing that also struck me was recognising evident areas of negative space – both small and large. These can perhaps be more clearly seen in the larger A3 drawings. For example:

Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 - Energy, A3 ink & brush 1 copy (NS)
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 – Energy, A3 ink & brush 1 copy (NS)
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 - Energy, A3 ink & brush 2 copy (NS)
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 – Energy, A3 ink & brush 2 copy (NS)
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 - Energy, A3 ink & brush 3 copy
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 – Energy, A3 ink & brush 3 copy

Having practiced in the sketchbook I think my A3 drawings have captured what I was trying to do – draw quickly to put down the gestural marks of the model poses. I made the drawings standing with brush and marker pen held at arms length and allowed my arm make the movements as best as I could without
bending my wrist or fingers – mostly with successful results I think.

Stuart Brownlee – 512319
14 December 2015

Part 4: Project 3: Exercise 3 – Stance

Brief

Look for the line of balance or the centre of gravity in a standing figure: it begins at the top of the skull and passes through the middle of the nose, straight down the middle of the chest cavity. With a back view, the line starts from the back of the neck on the spinal column. From a side view this line of balance starts at the back of the ear and travels down to the weight-bearing foot.

The line indicating the central axis also helps indicate where the body mass or majority of the body weight is placed. If the figure moves or if the model sits down, the weight or mass changes to a different area of the body.

Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 3 - course notes image 1
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 3 – course notes image 1

Move around the model before you begin to draw to get a sense of where the figure is in its allotted space and to identify its centre of gravity and gesture. Mark the central axis in your initial sketches of the standing figure. Ask the model to change poses every two to five minutes. Draw as many quick poses as you can.

These will be useful as reference material for future work.

Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 3 - course notes image 2
Warrior drawing by OCA tutor using a long stick and acrylic paint on A1 board
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 2 - course notes image 3
Warrior drawing by OCA tutor using a long stick and acrylic paint on A1 board

Drawings

For sketches 1 – 7 I used a 360⸋ DVD life model from Krieger, B. (2015) Figure drawing studio: drawing and painting the nude figure from pose photos. New York: Sterling Publishing.

All sketches drawn with 8B pencil, marked with weight balance and steadying balance.

Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 3 - Stance, sketches 1-2
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 3 – Stance, sketches 1-2
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 3 - Stance, sketches 3-4
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 3 – Stance, sketches 3-4
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 3 - Stance, sketches 5-6
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 3 – Stance, sketches 5-6
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 3 - Stance, sketch 7
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 3 – Stance, sketch 7

Full front view marked with 7 heads stance.

For sketches 8 and 9 I used a 360⸋ DVD life model from Chakkour, M.H. (2004) Virtual Pose 3: the ultimate visual reference series for drawing the human figure. Glouster, Mass: Hand Books Press.

Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 3 - Stance, sketch 8
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 3 – Stance, sketch 8
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 3 - Stance, sketch 9
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 3 – Stance, sketch 9

For sketches 10 – 12 I used a DVD life model from Krieger, B. (2015) Figure drawing studio: drawing and painting the nude figure from pose photos. New York: Sterling Publishing.

Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 3 - Stance, sketch 10
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 3 – Stance, sketch 10
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 3 - Stance, sketch 11
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 3 – Stance, sketch 11
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 3 - Stance, sketch 12
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 3 – Stance, sketch 12

Critique

Overall, I think I managed to capture the stances, forms,
proportions and balances of the various figures. However, there is no doubt that there are some saggy bottoms, over-large shoulders (particularly in the male figures) and mis-shaped facial expressions. Hands and feet are still a challenge – trying merely to suggest rather than detail. More practice needed.

Stuart Brownlee – 512319
12 December 2015

Part 4: Project 3: Exercise 2 – Essential elements

Brief

This time draw a sequence of six different poses lasting ten minutes each.

Adjust the light so that it hits just one side of the model, to emphasise the three dimensional form. Take time to look at the model and identify the darkest and lightest areas. Remember the basic shapes and begin to shade in the darkest tones.

Build up the different tonal values with loose hatching and/or broad sweeps of dark tone. Leave the white paper without marks for the lightest tones.

Draw the whole of the figure, and don’t concern yourself with detail.

Were you able to maintain a focus on proportion at the same time as creating a sense of weight and three-dimensional form?

Which drawing gives the best sense of the pose and why?

Was there any movement or gesture away from the model’s central axis? If so did you manage to identify this and put it into your drawing?

Make notes in your learning log.

Drawings

The model for this series of drawings was taken from a 360⸋ DVD movie that accompanies Chakkour, M.H. (2004) Virtual Pose 3: the ultimate visual reference series for drawing the human figure. Glouster, Mass: Hand Books Press.

Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 2 - Essential elements - sketch 1
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 2 – Essential elements – sketch 1

Drawn using a graphite block stick. I also showcased the figure against a black background to help it stand out against the white sketchbook page. The proportions of the back are maybe slightly out giving the impression of a hump where none existed.

Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 2 - Essential elements - sketch 2
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 2 – Essential elements – sketch 2

Model shifted round so that part of his head is showing. Drawn with graphite block stick. Better back proportions.

Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 2 - Essential elements - sketch 3
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 2 – Essential elements – sketch 3

Side-on view. Drawn with graphite block stick.

Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 2 - Essential elements - sketch 4
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 2 – Essential elements – sketch 4

Moving round to a foreshortened front-on view. This time drawn using a 9B pencil and conté stick background colouring.

Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 2 - Essential elements - sketch 5
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 2 – Essential elements – sketch 5

Other side-on view, using conté stick to draw the figure and soft pastel background colouring.

Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 2 - Essential elements - sketch 6
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 2 – Essential elements – sketch 6

Last sketch in the series – a challenging back view for which I experimented with drawing using primary inks and brush. Once dry, I used a graphite block stick to pick out some of the contours of the body shape.

Critique

Using the DVD movie provided me with an easy to access and use model which allowed me to select a number of different poses. For me the more interesting of these are the foreshortened front-on view and the back view. The front-on view provides the full sense of the body shape of the pose, while the back view suggests the full weight of the figure leaning forward on the stool.

I managed not to go into too much facial, hand and feet detail and believe that I have captured the essence of the pose using broadly differentiated areas of tonal shading capturing the weight and three-dimensional form of the model.

Stuart Brownlee – 512319
10 December 2015

Part 4: Project 3: Exercise 1 – Basic shapes

Brief

Arrange your model at a slight angle in a chair. Establish that they will be comfortable to sit in this pose for an hour or so (with breaks). Before you begin your drawing consider the angle of the central axis that runs through the seated figure. Notice any twists or bends.

Block in the basic shapes. Look carefully at which planes of the body are receding and which planes or lines are parallel to the edge of your picture plane. This will help you establish the bulk of the drawn figure in relation to the space around it.

Identify a measured unit that will help with the scale and proportions of the figure. Draw the model from different angles and positions. Remember to look and measure with each pose.

Identify the possibility of foreshortening and make written notes. Is there more than one line of movement? The torso may have a slight twist to it.

Sketches

For some inspiration and a better understanding of the exercise, I looked at Dan Gheno’s “Figure drawing master class” [Gheno, D. (2015) Figure drawing master class: lessons in life drawing. [pdf] Cincinnati, Ohio: North Light Books.] and noted the following pointers:

● Check the light source direction(s) [Figure drawing, p.10]
● Quality lines [Figure drawing, p.13]
● Identify the big planes of the human form [Figure drawing, p.14]
● Where is the ‘third line’ between light and dark [Figure drawing, p.15]
● Create a gesture drawing [Figure drawing, p. 18]
● Look for angles [Figure drawing, p.19]
● Sketch the interior lines within the body forms [Figure drawing, p.20]
● Identify shapes of the body – cylinders, ovals, boxes [Figure drawing, p.20]
● Check measurements [Figure drawing, p. 21]

Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 1 'Basic shapes' - sketch 1
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 1 ‘Basic shapes’ – sketch 1

My first attempt at this sketch saw my eye – well, deceiving my eye – and I drew the table/chair too large, which resulted in the torso being scrunched. So I decided to try again.

The re-drawn sketch is a much more focused attempt, with better angles around the central axis and a much lighter touch of mark making.

Both sketches drawn with 3H & 3B pencil, and smudging by finger.

Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 1 'Basic shapes' - sketch 2
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 1 ‘Basic shapes’ – sketch 2

Changed angle for model and this time sketched with 5H and watercolour pencil and waterbrush to add colour, with shading. Foreshortened leg.

Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 1 'Basic shapes' - sketch 3
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 1 ‘Basic shapes’ – sketch 3

A solid back view sketched in ink – simple, unfussy and capturing the clear lines of form.

Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 1 'Basic shapes' - sketch 4
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 1 ‘Basic shapes’ – sketch 4

Side-on view sketched in charcoal stick, with shading by finger and showing lines of body flow.

Stuart Brownlee – 512319
7 December 2015