Part 4: Project 3: Exercise 4 – Energy

Brief

Ask your model to adopt a ‘dynamic’ position – lifting an arm, twisting the hips, turning the head, stretching the arms or walking. They’ll need to be able to hold the pose for about five minutes.

Work on sheets of A3 paper and, using charcoal, brush pens or other tools that allow for broad and sweeping marks, quickly sketch the figure. Try to convey the sense of energy in each pose. Don’t worry about details – concentrate on the sense of movement in the figure.

Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 - course notes image
Marcel Vertes, The Tango (pen and ink)

The drawing above is all about movement. You can see how some rapidly drawn, flowing, undulating lines can create the effect of the dance. Lines repeated and close give the impression of movement. (Think of waves – tidal waves, heat waves, sound waves – all different kinds of repeated small or large movements.) Experiment with creating abstract marks that depict movement in your sketchbook.

Sketchbook ideas

I used charcoal pencil for all of these idea sketches and the models were once again taken from Krieger, B. (2015) Figure drawing studio: drawing and painting the nude figure from pose photos. New York: Sterling Publishing.

Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 - Energy, idea sketches 1-2
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 – Energy, idea sketches 1-2
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 - Energy, idea sketches 3-4
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 – Energy, idea sketches 3-4
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 - Energy, idea sketches 5-6
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 – Energy, idea sketches 5-6
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 - Energy, idea sketches 7-8
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 – Energy, idea sketches 7-8
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 - Energy, idea sketch 9
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 – Energy, idea sketch 9
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 - Energy, idea sketch 10
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 – Energy, idea sketch 10

A3 Drawings

I initially selected 4 idea sketches for my A3 drawings – 1, 4, 7 and 10 and I drew these on 250gsm A3 Bristol Board using black ink and a size 10 Round brush.

Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 - Energy, A3 ink & brush 1
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 – Energy, A3 ink & brush 1
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 - Energy, A3 ink & brush 2
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 – Energy, A3 ink & brush 2
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 - Energy, A3 ink & brush 3
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 – Energy, A3 ink & brush 3
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 - Energy, A3 ink & brush 4
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 – Energy, A3 ink & brush 4

I then selected idea sketches 5 and 8 and drew these on the same paper, but this time using a black marker pen.

Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 - Energy, A3 marker pen 1
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 – Energy, A3 marker pen 1
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 - Energy, A3 marker pen 2
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 – Energy, A3 marker pen 2

Critique

I found that using my sketchbook to draft out some of the ideas about the figures I had selected helped a lot, both by practice with the charcoal pencil and also to allow my eye to get in the way of seeing flowing lines to hint at the sense of movement. One thing that also struck me was recognising evident areas of negative space – both small and large. These can perhaps be more clearly seen in the larger A3 drawings. For example:

Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 - Energy, A3 ink & brush 1 copy (NS)
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 – Energy, A3 ink & brush 1 copy (NS)
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 - Energy, A3 ink & brush 2 copy (NS)
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 – Energy, A3 ink & brush 2 copy (NS)
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 - Energy, A3 ink & brush 3 copy
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 4 – Energy, A3 ink & brush 3 copy

Having practiced in the sketchbook I think my A3 drawings have captured what I was trying to do – draw quickly to put down the gestural marks of the model poses. I made the drawings standing with brush and marker pen held at arms length and allowed my arm make the movements as best as I could without
bending my wrist or fingers – mostly with successful results I think.

Stuart Brownlee – 512319
14 December 2015