Part 4: Project 3: Exercise 2 – Essential elements

Brief

This time draw a sequence of six different poses lasting ten minutes each.

Adjust the light so that it hits just one side of the model, to emphasise the three dimensional form. Take time to look at the model and identify the darkest and lightest areas. Remember the basic shapes and begin to shade in the darkest tones.

Build up the different tonal values with loose hatching and/or broad sweeps of dark tone. Leave the white paper without marks for the lightest tones.

Draw the whole of the figure, and don’t concern yourself with detail.

Were you able to maintain a focus on proportion at the same time as creating a sense of weight and three-dimensional form?

Which drawing gives the best sense of the pose and why?

Was there any movement or gesture away from the model’s central axis? If so did you manage to identify this and put it into your drawing?

Make notes in your learning log.

Drawings

The model for this series of drawings was taken from a 360⸋ DVD movie that accompanies Chakkour, M.H. (2004) Virtual Pose 3: the ultimate visual reference series for drawing the human figure. Glouster, Mass: Hand Books Press.

Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 2 - Essential elements - sketch 1
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 2 – Essential elements – sketch 1

Drawn using a graphite block stick. I also showcased the figure against a black background to help it stand out against the white sketchbook page. The proportions of the back are maybe slightly out giving the impression of a hump where none existed.

Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 2 - Essential elements - sketch 2
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 2 – Essential elements – sketch 2

Model shifted round so that part of his head is showing. Drawn with graphite block stick. Better back proportions.

Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 2 - Essential elements - sketch 3
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 2 – Essential elements – sketch 3

Side-on view. Drawn with graphite block stick.

Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 2 - Essential elements - sketch 4
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 2 – Essential elements – sketch 4

Moving round to a foreshortened front-on view. This time drawn using a 9B pencil and conté stick background colouring.

Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 2 - Essential elements - sketch 5
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 2 – Essential elements – sketch 5

Other side-on view, using conté stick to draw the figure and soft pastel background colouring.

Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 2 - Essential elements - sketch 6
Part 4 Project 3 Exercise 2 – Essential elements – sketch 6

Last sketch in the series – a challenging back view for which I experimented with drawing using primary inks and brush. Once dry, I used a graphite block stick to pick out some of the contours of the body shape.

Critique

Using the DVD movie provided me with an easy to access and use model which allowed me to select a number of different poses. For me the more interesting of these are the foreshortened front-on view and the back view. The front-on view provides the full sense of the body shape of the pose, while the back view suggests the full weight of the figure leaning forward on the stool.

I managed not to go into too much facial, hand and feet detail and believe that I have captured the essence of the pose using broadly differentiated areas of tonal shading capturing the weight and three-dimensional form of the model.

Stuart Brownlee – 512319
10 December 2015