Part 4: Project 5: Exercise 1 – The moving figure

Brief for Project 5

Drawing a moving figure is different from drawing a posed figure – the person won’t slow down or wait patiently for you to finish. You’ve already had some practice in producing quick figure drawings but this project may be more of a challenge because you’ll need to draw quickly to record your subject in motion. This will probably mean looking up and out, concentrating on the subject in front of you while drawing ‘blind’, rather than looking down and concentrating on the sheet of paper.

As well as working outdoors and indoors you can draw people from a window, car, etc. Wherever you are, draw quickly and keep your eyes on the figure in action. Try to capture the vitality of the movement through fast and confident marks and lines, and don’t be tempted to repair or overwork the final image. Keep looking at the figure rather than the paper.

Use quick exploratory lines to express the overall flow and movement rather than seeking a perfect reproduction. Think about the speed and purpose of the figure in movement and how to capture the energy through stance, mark-making, etc. For example, someone running for a bus may have their coat flying and head thrust forward; the figure will have momentum and intention. Try to express this.

While working, make notes about your observation of moving figures and why they’ve caught your attention. Think about:

• Narrative – the story that reveals the reason for the activity, such as running for a bus or dancing.
• Interaction – merging the moving figure with its surroundings, considering its relation to the environment and other figures, buildings, etc.

Look at the energy in this fast brush drawing by Richard Hambleton; his brush strokes echo the speed of the figure. Now go to David Haines’ website (http://www.davidhaines.org/work02.html) and find the drawing New Balance Sneakers vs KFC Bucket. Note the more restrained movement of the figures and the artist’s detailed rendition of the scene in pencil; here the act of drawing is slower and more careful.

Part 4 Project 5 Exercise 1 - course notes image
Richard Hambleton, Osaka, 1981 (Godfrey, 1990, p.53)

doublejumpers
Hambleton, R. (1999) Double jumpers. [Acrylic on canvas] [Online] Available at: http://www.woodwardgallery.net/hambleton.html   [Accessed: 31 December 2015]
Bizarrely energetic mark making – the joy of movement is ‘jumping’
off the paper.

2B5D9927-8F23-4F38-B5D8-A39BEE74FF83
Haines, D. (2007/08) New balance sneaker vs KFC bucket. [Pencil on paper] [Online] Available at: http://www.davidhaines.org/work02.html  [Accessed: 31 December 2015]
Hyper-real drawing – action frozen in time, suspended in its every detail as seen by the viewer.

Scan-151231-0003
Goodwin, D. (2009) Amit. [Watercolour on paper, from the Red Studies series] In: Maslen, M. and Southern, J. (2014) Drawing projects: an exploration of the language of drawing. London: Black Dog Publishing, p17.
“Drawing can be seen as an act of theatre” – an interactive
dialogue… a performance.” 

“A photograph is static because it has stopped time. A drawing or painting is static because it encompasses time.” Berger, J. (first published in New Society, 1976) Drawn to that moment. [Essay] [pdf] [Online] Available at:
http://www.spokesmanbooks.com/Spokesman/PDF/90Berger.pdf
[Accessed: 31 December 2015]

Brief for Exercise 1 – Single moving figure

Keep drawing moving figures in your sketchbooks. Try to fill a page a day; this will be a rich resource for future work as well as improving your figure drawing through regular practice.

How well have you managed to create the sense of a moving figure rather than a static pose?

Sketches

Part 4 Project 5 Exercise 1 - Single moving figure, sketches 1 & 2
Part 4 Project 5 Exercise 1 – Single moving figure, sketches 1 & 2

I was intrigued by the ‘two pencil’ section in The drawing projects: An exploration of the language of drawing, pp73-75 (Maslen and Southern, 2011) and gave it go in sketches 1 to 5. I think the effect achieved does add a sense of energy to the figures, suggesting movement. The figures do feel more than mere static poses.

Part 4 Project 5 Exercise 1 - Single moving figure, sketches 3 & 4
Part 4 Project 5 Exercise 1 – Single moving figure, sketches 3 & 4

I used 360⸋ DVD life models from Virtual Pose 3: the ultimate visual reference series for drawing the human figure (Chakkour, 2004) for sketches 1 to 10 in this series.

Part 4 Project 5 Exercise 1 - Single moving figure, sketch 5
Part 4 Project 5 Exercise 1 – Single moving figure, sketch 5

In this sketch I added colour by taping 1 2B pencil with a blue and orange coloured pencils. Again, I think that movement is proposed in the stretching figure, both with the trailing leg and also the head reaching forward.

Part 4 Project 5 Exercise 1 - Single moving figure, sketches 6 & 9
Part 4 Project 5 Exercise 1 – Single moving figure, sketches 6 & 9

Dropping the black pencil, these blue and orange coloured pencil sketches hint at movement, especially with the crawling figure.

Part 4 Project 5 Exercise 1 - Single moving figure, sketch 10
Part 4 Project 5 Exercise 1 – Single moving figure, sketch 10

Change of colour to red and green pencils taped together and then the colour spread out slightly with a blender pen to try and capture a sense of movement.

Part 4 Project 5 Exercise 1 - Single moving figure, sketch 11
Part 4 Project 5 Exercise 1 – Single moving figure, sketch 11

For sketches 11 to 13, I used three dancers as my models, this sketch quickly laid down with InkTense block ink and brush pen – a fairly speedy method of capturing a moving figure.

Part 4 Project 5 Exercise 1 - Single moving figure, sketch 12
Part 4 Project 5 Exercise 1 – Single moving figure, sketch 12

The sketchbook page was rubbed with graphite powder, aiming for an atmospheric effect, and I used Artbar wax colour and blender pen to again try and keep up with the movement of the figure.

Part 4 Project 5 Exercise 1 - Single moving figure, sketch 13
Part 4 Project 5 Exercise 1 – Single moving figure, sketch 13

Continuing to try out different media I chose DJECO gel pens to aim for the flow of the dancer’s dress and arm and leg movements.

Critique

Overall, I think a sense of movement has been achieved in the figures drawn. I particularly enjoyed using the ‘two/three’ taped pencil method to quickly give the effect of energy and movement in the figure. It was a bit weird at first, but once becoming familiar with the ‘double vision’ appearance of the lines, it now seems like quite a natural method of sketching moving figures.

I also found that working with each of the coloured medium – InkTense block ink, Artbar wax block, and gel pens – offered different opportunities to try and capture that sense of movement – drawing lines quickly and overdrawing with different colours to gradually build not just layers of colour but also lines adding to the impression of movement.

Stuart Brownlee – 512319
6 January 2016